Night / Elie Wiesel ; translated from the French by Marion Wiesel.

By: Wiesel, Elie, 1928-Contributor(s): Wiesel, MarionMaterial type: TextTextLanguage: English Original language: French, Yiddish Publication details: New York, NY : Hill and Wang, a division of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006Edition: 1st ed. of new translationDescription: xxi, 120 p. ; 22 cmISBN: 9780809073566 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0809073560 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780809073559 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0809073552 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0374500010 (pbk.); 9780374500016 (pbk.); 0374399972 (hbk.); 9780374399979 (hbk.); 9780329550240 (FollettBound); 0329550241 (FollettBound)Uniform titles: Un di velt hot geshvign. English Subject(s): Wiesel, Elie, 1928- -- Childhood and youth | Jews -- Romania -- Sighet -- Biography | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Romania -- Sighet -- Personal narratives | Sighet (Romania) -- BiographyGenre/Form: Creative nonfiction.LOC classification: D810.J4 | W514 2006
Contents:
Preface to the New Translation by Elie Wiesel -- Foreword by Fran?cois Mauriac -- Night -- The Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Delivered by Elie Wiesel in Oslo (Norway) on December 10, 1986.
Summary: Born in the town of Sighet, Transylvania, Elie Wiesel was a teenager when he and his family were taken from their home in 1944 to the Auschwitz concentration camp, and then to Buchenwald. [This book] is the terrifying record of Elie Wiesel's memories of the death of his family, the death of his own innocence, and his despair as a deeply observant Jew confronting the absolute evil of man.
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Integrated Humanities 2


Born in the town of Sighet, Transylvania, Elie Wiesel was a teenager when he and his family were taken from their home in 1944 to the Auschwitz concentration camp, and then to Buchenwald. [This book] is the terrifying record of Elie Wiesel's memories of the death of his family, the death of his own innocence, and his despair as a deeply observant Jew confronting the absolute evil of man.

Preface to the New Translation by Elie Wiesel -- Foreword by Fran?cois Mauriac -- Night -- The Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Delivered by Elie Wiesel in Oslo (Norway) on December 10, 1986.

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