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The Christian imagination : theology and the origins of race / Willie James Jennings.

By: Jennings, Willie James, 1961-Material type: TextTextPublication details: New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, ?2010. Description: x, 366 p. ; 25 cmISBN: 9780300152111; 0300152116; 9780300171365; 0300171366Subject(s): Race relations -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Race -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Socialization | Zurara, Gomes Eanes de, approximately 1410-1473 or 1474 | Henry, Infante of Portugal, 1394-1460 | Acosta, Jos?e de, 1540-1600 | Colenso, John William, 1814-1883LOC classification: BT734.2 | .J46 2010
Contents:
Displacement: Zurara's tears -- Acosta's laugh -- Translation: Colenso's heart -- Equiano's words -- Intimacy: White space and literacy -- Those near belonging.
Summary: Weaving together the stories of Zurara, the royal chronicler of Prince Henry, the Jesuit theologian Jose de Acosta, the famed Anglican Bishop John William Colenso, and the former slave writer Olaudah Equiano, Jennings narrates a tale of loss, forgetfulness, and missed opportunities for the transformation of Christian communities. Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.
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Item type Current library Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Main Collection Books John Brown University Library
Main BT734.2 .J46 2010 Available 39524100394943

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Displacement: Zurara's tears -- Acosta's laugh -- Translation: Colenso's heart -- Equiano's words -- Intimacy: White space and literacy -- Those near belonging.

Weaving together the stories of Zurara, the royal chronicler of Prince Henry, the Jesuit theologian Jose de Acosta, the famed Anglican Bishop John William Colenso, and the former slave writer Olaudah Equiano, Jennings narrates a tale of loss, forgetfulness, and missed opportunities for the transformation of Christian communities. Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.

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